Select Page

Samphire or Salicornia.

Samphire is a native succulent also referred to as sea asparagus, swamp grass, salicorne, glasswort, pickleweed and sea beans. Woody at the base and with many branches it grows freely on many of Southern Australia’s salty flats. High in Vitamin A and a good source of...

read more

Sweet Sasparilla or Smilax Glyciphylla

The leaves, stems, and flowers contain the glycoside glyciphyllin, which has a bitter-sweet taste and may be the active medicinal component. Recent research shows that S. glyciphylla has antioxidant activity Where and When to find it? It is a dioecious climber native...

read more

Warrigal Greens or Tetragonia Tetragoniodes

Tetragonia tetragonioides, also known as Botany Bay greens, native spinach or New Zealand spinach, is today one of the better known of our edible native plants. Food foragers and gardeners have long appreciated it for its accessibility and weed-like ability to thrive...

read more

Old Man Salt Bush or Atriplex Nummularia

Old man saltbush is a familiar sight over large areas of dry inland Australia. It is a sprawling grey-blue shrub that can grow up to 3 metres high and 5 metres wide. Where and When to find it? It is a long living plant growing strongly after periods of summer rain....

read more

Seablite or Suaeda australis

Aussie Sea Fern (Family Chenopodiaceae) seablite. Where and When to find it? This coastal plant is related to Samphire and a relative of this plant is widely used throughout Europe as a sea vegetable (sometimes referred to as "Sea Spray"). Seablite naturally grows in...

read more

Pig Face or Carpobrotus Glaucescens

Also known as Ice plant or the angular sea fig. Where and When to find it? Pig Face is a plant that is native to this continent and is both edible and medicinal. Pig face grows best in full sun all up and down the coast of Eastern and Southern Australia. How to use...

read more